Bangabandhu

Our Art & Design Curriculum

Article 29: Education must develop every child’s personality, talents and abilities to the full

Our goal is for our children to become artists. Artists must have: 

Early Years - Nursery & Reception Curriculum 

Early Years Foundation Stage - what does Art and Design look like in the Early Years?

In the Revised Early Years Foundation Stage, art is found in the Expressive Arts and Design area of the Foundation Stage Curriculum and  is broken down into two aspects:


Exploring and Using Media and Materials

This is about how children experiment with media and materials finding out about their properties and modifying and manipulating them. It includes exploring sounds, patterns, movement and different tools and techniques.

Being Imaginative

This is about children’s explorations into the world of pretence, building on their experiences of the real world and transforming them into something new – whether through role play, music, pretend play, block play or small world play or a range of other areas.

The document below outlines in more detail the specific art and design objectives within the Early Years curriculum, what it looks like in practice, and demonstrates the links between the Early Years and the KS1 art and design curriculum.  It also highlights key vocabulary taught within our Early Years and at Key Stage 1.

Art and Design  - Early Years to Key Stage 1 Curriculum Links. 

Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 Curriculum

Fundamental Foundations

We believe that for children to secure greater depth, it is important that they first have solid fundamental foundations. Fundamental foundations should not be rushed and so the notion of ‘rapid progress’ must be dismissed. Instead the goal of repetition should be seen as both useful and necessary. This is why you will see us returning regularly to art knowledge and concepts.  

Cognitive Domains – Degrees of Understanding  

We refer to three degrees of understanding and thinking ‘Basic’, ‘Advancing’ and ‘Deep’.  

BASIC – Low level cognitive demand. Involves acquisition of fundamental foundations.  

ADVANCING – Higher level cognitive demands beyond recall. Requires application involving some degree of decision making in how to apply fundamental foundations.  

DEEP – Cognitive demand involves non-standard, non-routine, inter-connected, multi-step thinking in problems with more than one possible solution. Requires reasoning and justification for the inventive application of fundamental foundations. 

Time Scales for Progression Through the Cognitive Domains

Milestone 1 – Y1 & Y2 

Milestone 2 – Y3 & Y4 

Milestone 3 – Y5 & Y6  

Each milestone should be seen as containing two phases. In the first phase, pupils should repeat the content a sufficient number of times to secure fundamental foundations; in the second phase, they should apply the foundations in order to reach the ‘expected’ standard. If they reach this before the end of the second phase, they should move on to tasks that will secure greater depth. Thus, progress through the cognitive domains take two years.  

It is expected that by the end of Year 1, pupils should be able to complete the BASIC tasks to secure fundamental foundations and by the end of Year 2, the ADVANCING tasks. It is also reasonable that a number of children may move on to the DEEP activities if they secure an early understanding of advancing.  

Milestone 1 

Y1 & Y2 

Milestone 2 

Y3 & Y4

Milestone 3

Y5 & Y6

Beginning 

Y1 

Advancing 

Y2 

Deep 

Y2

Beginning 

Y3 

Advancing 

Y4

Deep 

Y4

Beginning 

Y5

Advancing 

Y6 

Deep 

Y6

Page 144 of the Primary National Curriculum 2014 states: 

‘While it is important that pupils make progress, it is also vitally important that they develop secure understanding of each key block of knowledge and concepts in order to progress to the next stage. Insecure, superficial understanding will not allow genuine progress: pupils may struggle at key points of transition (such as between primary and secondary school), build up serious misconceptions, and/or have significant difficulties in understanding higher-order content.’ 

We believe that it is therefore extremely important to secure the fundamental foundations before trying to secure greater depth.   

Curriculum Breadth, Depth &  Progression Principles 

We have carefully planned our curriculum to ensure progression as well as breadth and depth. These are the principles we have adhered to: 

Building an Art & Design Schema at Bangabandhu

Our pupils will form an Art & Design schema* by: 

*Schema – Schema theory states that all knowledge is organised into units. A schema therefore is a conceptual system for understanding knowledge. A subject schema is a way of organising knowledge in a meaningful way; it is an appreciation of how facts are connected and the ways in which they are connected. A schema is distinct from information, which is just isolated facts that have no organisational basis or links.  

Threshold Concepts broken into Milestones - Progression through Key Stages

MILESTONE 1

Develop Ideas

Take Inspiration from the Greats 

  • Respond to ideas and starting points.
  • Explore ideas and collect visual information. 
  • Explore different methods and materials as ideas develop.
  • Describe the work of notable artists, artisans and designers. 
  • Use some of the ideas from artist srudies.
Master Practical Skills

Paint 

  • Use thick and thin brushes. 
  • Mix primary colours to make secondary colours. 
  • Add white to colours to make tints and black to colours to make tones. 
  • Create colour wheels. 

Collage 

  • Use a combination of materials that are cut, torn and glued. 
  • Sort and arrange materials. 
  • Mix materials to create texture. 

Sculpture 

  • Use a combination of shapes. 
  • Include lines and texture. 
  • Use rolled up paper, straws, paper, card and clay as materials. 
  • Use techniques such as rolling, cutting, moulding and carving. 

Drawing 

  • Draw lines of different sizes and thicknesses. 
  • Colour (own work) neatly, following the lines. 
  • Show pattern and texture by adding dots and lines. 
  • Show different tones by using coloured pencils. 

 Print 

  • Use repeating or overlapping shapes. 
  • Mimic print from the environment (eg wallpapers). 
  • Use objects to create prints (eg fruits, vegetables or sponges). 
  • Press, roll, sub and stamp to make prints.

 Textiles 

  • Use weaving to create a pattern. 
  • Join materials using glue and/or a stitch. 
  • Use plaiting. 
  • Use dip dye techniques.

 Digital Media 

  • Use a wide range of tools to create different texture, lines, tones, colours and shapes.

MILESTONE 2

Develop Ideas Take Inspiration from the Greats
  • Develop and imaginatively extend ideas from starting points throughout the curriculum. 
  • Collect information, sketches and resources and present ideas imaginatively in a sketchbook. 
  • Use the qualities of materials to enhance ideas. 
  • Spot the potential in unexpected results as work progresses. 
  • Comment on artworks with a fluent grasp of visual language. 
  • Give details (including own sketches) about the style of some notable artists, artisans and designers. 
  • Show how the work of those studied was influential in both society and to other artists. 
  • Create original pieces that show a range of influences and styles. 
Master Practical Skills

Paint 

  • Sketch (lightly) before painting to combine line and colour. 
  • Create a colour palette based upon colours observed in the natural or built worlds.
  • Use the qualities of watercolour and acrylic paints to create visually interesting pieces. 
  • Combine colours, tones and tints to enhance the mood of a piece. 
  • Use brush techniques and the qualities of paint to create texture. 
  • Develop a personal style of painting, drawing based on ideas from other artists. 

Collage 

  • Mix texture (rough and smooth, plain and patterned). 
  • Combine visual and tactile qualities. 
  • Use ceramic mosaic materials and techniques. 

Sculpture 

  • Show lifelike qualities and real life proportions or, if more abstract, provoke different interpretations. 
  • Use tools to carve and add shapes, texture and pattern. 
  • Combine visual and tactile qualities. 
  • Use frameworks (such as wire or moulds) to provide stability and form. 

Drawing 

  • Use a variety of techniques to add interesting effect (eg reflections, shadows, direction of sunlight).
  • Use a choice of techniques to depict movement, perspective, shadows and reflection.
  • Choose a style of drawing suitable for work (eg realistic or impressionistic). 
  • Use line to represent movement. 

Print 

  • Build up layers of colours. 
  • Create an accurate pattern, showing fine detail. 
  • Use a range of visual elements to reflect the purpose of the work. 

Textiles 

  • Show precision in techniques. 
  • Choose from a range of stitching techniques. 
  • Combine previously learned techniques to create pieces. 

Digital Media 

  • Enhance digital media by editing (including sound, video, animation, still images and installations).  
MILESTONE 3
Develop Ideas Take Inspiration from the Greats
  • Develop and imaginatively extend ideas from starting points throughout the curriculum. 
  • Collect information, sketches and resources and present ideas imaginatively in a sketchbook. 
  • Use the qualities of materials to enhance ideas. 
  • Spot the potential in unexpected results as work progresses. 
  • Comment on artworks with a fluent grasp of visual language.
  • Give details (including own sketches) about the style of some notable artists, artisans and designers. 
  • Show how the work of those studied was influential in both society and to other artists. 
  • Create original pieces that show a range of influences and styles. 
Master Practical Skills

Paint 

  • Sketch (lightly) before painting to combine line and colour. 
  • Create a colour palette based upon colours observed in the natural and built worlds. 
  • Use the qualities of watercolour and acrylic paints to create visually interesting pieces. 
  • Combine colours, tones and tints to enhance the mood of a piece. 
  • Use brush techniques and the qualities of paint to create texture. 
  • Develop a personal style of painting, drawing based on ideas from other artists. 

Collage 

  • Mix texture (rough and smooth, plain and patterned). 
  • Combine visual and tactile qualities. 
  • Use ceramic mosaic materials and techniques. 

Sculpture 

  • Show lifelike qualities and real life proportions or, if more abstract, provoke different interpretations. 
  • Use tools to carve and add shapes, texture and pattern. 
  • Combine visual and tactile qualities. 
  • Use frameworks (such as wire or moulds) to provide stability and form. 

Drawing

  • Use a variety of techniques to add interesting effect (eg reflections, shadows, direction of sunlight).
  • Use a choice of techniques to depict movement, perspective, shadows and reflection.
  • Choose a style of drawing suitable for work (eg realistic or impressionistic). 

Print

  • Build up layers of colours. 
  • Create an accurate pattern, showing fine detail. 
  • Use a range of visual elements to reflect the purpose of the work. 

Textiles 

  • Show precision in techniques. 
  • Choose from a range of stitching techniques. 
  • Combine previously learned techniques to create pieces. 

Digital Media 

  • Enhance digital media by editing (including sound, video, animation, still images and installations). 

Curriculum Breadth, Depth & Progression Principles 

We have carefully planned our curriculum to ensure progression as well as breadth and depth. These are the principles we have adhered to: 

 Curriculum Breadth Maps (topics) - Intent

Subject Specific Vocabulary

We teach children  a rich and broad vocabulary in order that they  develop a deep understanding of the subjects they study.  We carefully select this subject vocabulary, teaching it in context.  Here is the art and design vocabulary we teach in each milestone.

Milestone 1

Milestone 2

Milestone 3

How we Implement our Curriculum

Art is taught fortnightly for 1 hour and 10 minutes.  We do not block our subjects as we want children to return regularly to the subject knowledge and concepts in order that they are regularly retrieving the tuaght knowledge and concepts, embedding these in their long term memory.  This enables them to make progress - know more and remember more. 

Beyond the  National Curriculum - Cultural Capital Experiences 

Cultural capital is the essential knowledge that children need to prepare them for their future success. We want to ensure that children at Bangabandhu have a wide and varied range of experiences as they progress through our school. We want them to know about their world; to build a schema of knowledge and to do this through first hand experiences. We intend to provide our children with opportunities to develop not just their knowledge but their interests and talents. Our aim is to prepare them for a successful future. 

Our school is in an area of high socio-economic deprivation. We are focused on addressing this disadvantage. Our curriculum is the main provider of cultural capital however there are other aspects of school life which provide essential cultural capital and should not be overlooked. We have planned the cultural provision that goes beyond the curriculum and this plan can be found below.  This plan is to capture, illustrate and to strategically plan for the breadth and range of cultural capital experiences we will provide for our children as they move through the school. We are not leaving such an essential element of our school’s provision to chance or individual teacher interest. When a child leaves Bangabandhu in Year 6, we will be certain of what they have learnt and experienced and know that they will be prepared for the next step in their learning and personal development.  

Bangabandhu's Whole School Cultural Capital, Trips and Experiences Plan